Monthly Archives: January 2016

Korsakow – A tool for … what?

Only three weeks into the new year, and things are already advancing rapidly, again. Adrian Miles felt like kicking things off in our first session of supervision this Monday when he had us draw a timline for our PhD projects. Reverse-engineering it from the time I should be finished (which is March 2018 THE LATEST), I ended up with quite a work-intensive schedule for 2016. According to my calculations, this would mean that by the end of this year, I will have

  • attended three conferences
  • published two articles
  • completed my fieldwork AND reception study
  • analyzed my data
  • AND written one to two chapters of my dissertation

Right. Not sure if this is supposed to motivate or scare me. Probably the plan is a bit ambitious, to say the least. Afterall, it’s hard to know your time management, when there is nearly any external institution that makes you meet certain deadlines along the way. This reminds me again of one of the biggest differences compared to the Australian (or RMIT?) system, where you have to present milestones at regular intervals throughout your candidature (very clear requirements indeed, even a specific word count that has to be achieved – this is how clear it can get!). Anyway, having this rather vague timeline hanging on my fridge now definitely serves as one thing: a reminder that there will be an end to this sheer never-ending endeavor to “map Korsakow”.

As for the ongoing process of my lit review, the supervision group has been quite helpful as well. Following our discussions on Simon O’Sullivan’s The Aesthetics of Affect piece, and the confusion it produced regarding affect theory, we decided to dig a bit deeper into the field of new materialism. A while ago, my attention was drawn to actor-network theory but after having tried and failed to understand this “theory” (I know it is NOT a theory but it is called “theory” after all right?) by reading Latour, confusion overwhelmed me and I put it back on the massive stack of “to be read”. Although, we did not get a chance to talk about this on Monday, the readings of Annemarie Mol’s article on Actor-Network Theory: Sensitive Turns and Enduring Tensions and John Law’s chapter on Multiple Worlds already offered a highly beneficial starting point for further enquiry.

Feeling the (positive) pressure stirring up inside of me, I scheduled another interview for the next day. This time it would be with Seth Keen, a lecturer at RMIT in the media program, specialized in teaching the new media strand courses. I had already met Seth during MINA festival, the Dialogues and Atmospheres Symposium as well as Craig Hight’s Masterclass in Documentary and was really excited to talk to him more in depth about his specific approach to Korsakow considering that he had developped an authoring tool for interactive media himself during the course of his PhD. Compared to my other interviewees, Adrian Miles and Hannah Brasier, his perspective appears to be slightly different and perhaps a bit more closely related to my own ideas surrounding Korsakow as a tool and for what this tool could possibly be used for. At this point, I don’t want to give too much away just yet. But check out his definition of Korsakow and get an idea on what this could be hinting at:

By adding more pieces to the puzzle, the Korsakow picture gets more precise as it gets blurry. At least, actor-network theory and new materialism promise to become helpful tools in finding an appropriate set of terms for describing how the different actors involved enact each other. Hopefully, the Docuverse Symposium in February will bring more people together working in the field of expanding notions on documentary theory and practice and will, thus, serve as a platform for addressing questions such as how to make sense of all these different perspectives in the context of documentary knowledge production and dissemination.

Here is our updated Call for Contributions with details on confirmed speakers, location and RSVP:

Updated Call for Contributions DOCUVERSE